Nasw science writers 2012 presidential candidates

Ron Winslow Wall Street Journal In four years as a NASW officer and board member, I have worked with the board to update our bylaws and procedures, expand initiatives that help members adapt to the dramatic changes in journalism, and broaden our connections with science writers around the world. As treasurer, I worked with an astute Finance Committee to strengthen our budget planning and establish an orderly process for managing the influx of Authors Coalition funds that has enabled a significant expansion of services NASW provides to science writers. I look forward to working with the board and other volunteers as we continue as an organization and as individuals to find ways to thrive amid the economic, technological, and societal forces affecting our profession.

Nasw science writers 2012 presidential candidates

Ron Winslow Wall Street Journal In four years as a NASW officer and board member, I have worked with the board to update our bylaws and procedures, expand initiatives that help members adapt to the dramatic changes in journalism, and broaden our connections with science writers around the world.

As treasurer, I worked with an astute Finance Committee to strengthen our budget planning and establish an orderly process for managing the influx of Authors Coalition funds that has enabled a significant expansion of services NASW provides to science writers.

I look forward to working with the board and other volunteers as we continue as an organization and as individuals to find ways to thrive amid the economic, technological, and societal forces affecting our profession.

And I hope that despite the distractions we can embrace the excitement of pursuing stories on the front lines of new knowledge and the interplay between science and society. I have been a reporter and editor at the Wall Street Journal for 29 years, including more than two decades covering health and medicine.

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Science writing is at a crossroads, and we need to figure out how journalists can make their mark in a bloggy world.

Beryl Lieff Benderly freelance Recent years have been extremely challenging for professional science writers, with employers and clients vanishing and available opportunities often requiring unfamiliar skills.

Thanks to income from the Authors Coalition, which NASW joined through my efforts inNASW has developed an expanding range of services, including greatly enhanced market information; travel, career and idea grants; and much more.

NASW has also developed an increasingly strategic approach to handling funds. Decades of freelancing for a wide range of print and online clients make me keenly aware of the conditions science writers face today.

National Association of Social Workers: NASW: Endorse Bernie Sanders for President : socialwork

Member-at-Large Candidates Jill Adams freelance With an ever-shifting media landscape, science writers must work ever harder to justify what it is we do. I think one of the great benefits of our organization is the opportunity to share stories and strategies for success.

Many of my closest science writer friends are people I first met at annual meetings, including the members of Scilance, an online group of freelance science writers now working on an NASW grant-supported book about science writing in the new era.

Melissa Lutz Blouin University of Arkansas Science writers must always be learning new things, whether they are writing about the latest research findings or taking on a changing work environment.

If elected to the board, I would address this need by working to help NASW grow new and innovative projects for its members through education and financial support of member projects. For the past 14 years, I have worked as director of science and research communications at the University of Arkansas.

I currently serve as president of the University Research Magazine Association. Through these and other NASW projects, I have demonstrated my ability to work with teams of people with diverse interests and to help them move forward to create positive change. A recent analysis revealed that many new members never renew for a second year, but new members who renew once are likely to stay members for years.

I think some relatively simple tactics will encourage new members to renew. Also, there are whole areas of science writing from which we derive very few members. For example, NASW is under-represented among technology writers, and we also have relatively few professional scientists who write about science for the general public.

I think we can find ways to convince those groups that NASW has something to offer. I am seeking a position on the NASW board to work to enhance our member services and professional development programs.

Since attending my first NASW meeting inI have benefitted from our association, with contacts, mentoring, fellowships, and grants. Through putting together NASW workshops on podcasting and rhetoric, serving on the Workshop Committee, participating on panels, mentoring students, speaking before mentor-program participants, and helping host two events for science writers at AAAS meetings in St.

I would like to do more. Having served the D. Science Writers Association as board member and treasurer, I believe I have prepared myself to do more to serve our community.

As of last summerI am again a freelance after spending four years at Science magazine as multimedia producer and weekly podcast host. I am chapter author on multimedia freelancing for the forthcoming NASW-sponsored field guide for science writers, know well both traditional and new media, and am keenly aware of constraints that limit the efforts of staffers and freelancers alike to adapt to our changing media landscape.

We are an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a health policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. We cover health policy, comparative effectiveness research, health care financing, hospitals, doctors, nurses, etc.

Prior to this, I was executive editor of consumer publishing for Congressional Quarterly. Some of our stories covered environment, technology, health care, and science policy.

The first 32 years of my career were spent in broadcasting. I was a managing editor at NPR News, coordinated the radio newsroom expansion into multimedia for npr.

Among other jobs in my eclectic career: I have previously served as NASW vice president and treasurer. One of my proudest accomplishments was helping develop a travel stipend program that has allowed top science-writing students to attend the AAAS meeting each year with their expenses paid.

I have also helped manage the ever-growing mentorship program and internship fair at the AAAS meeting. I will continue to bring to the board a perspective from several sides of science writing. I am currently senior director of research and innovation communications at Ohio State University, and write extensively about social science research.Diversity Travel Fellows (funded by the National Association of Science Writers) with Danielle Lee (far left) at the ScienceWriters conference.

Crystal Garner @shesagarner Crystal Garner is a senior at The University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg, MS, studying broadcast journalism and computer science. She has formerly worked. The best guide for teaching and learning effective science writing, this second edition of A Field Guide for Science Writers improves on the classic first edition with a wider range of topics, a new slate of writers, and an up-to-date exploration of the most stimulating and challenging issues in science.

Page 1 of 27 NASW-TN Candidate Biographical Information Spring NASW-TN Board of Directors Candidates CANDIDATE FOR VICE PRESIDENT Ragan Schriver, LAPSW, ACSW, Psy.D.

Candace Gingrich, half-sister of Republican Presidential candidate Newt Gingrich Colin Powell, former United States Secretary of State, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, National Security Advisor, four-star General (Ret.) [93].

nasw science writers 2012 presidential candidates

I really dislike the NASW in the first place because they don't really seem to do anything for social workers, but it would be nice if they encouraged others to vote for someone in their estimation (as per the NASW code of ethics) that would further our work.

Web Exclusive. Five Reminders for Social Workers on the Run-up to the Election By Rose Frech, MSW, LSW September As Election Day draws near, it is important for social workers to brush up on their roles and responsibilities related to political and social action.

Five Reminders for Social Workers on the Run-up to the Election